About the ASHA Journals

ASHA publishes four peer-reviewed scholarly journals pertaining to the general field of communication sciences and disorders (CSD) and to the professions of audiology and speech-language pathology, two of which are more clinical in nature and one that is more setting-specific in nature. Their collective mission is the dissemination of research findings, theoretical advances, and clinical knowledge in the field of communication sciences and disorders.

AJA publishes peer-reviewed research and other scholarly articles pertaining to clinical audiology methods and issues, and serves as an outlet for discussion of related professional and educational issues and ideas. The journal is an international outlet for clinical research pertaining to screening, diagnosis, management and outcomes of hearing and balance disorders as well as the etiologies and characteristics of these disorders. The clinical orientation of the journal allows for the publication of reports on audiology as implemented nationally and internationally, including novel clinical procedures, approaches, and cases. AJA seeks to advance evidence-based practice by disseminating the results of new studies as well as providing a forum for critical reviews and meta-analyses of previously published work.
The broad field of clinical audiology, including audiologic/aural rehabilitation; balance and balance disorders; cultural and linguistic diversity; detection, diagnosis, prevention, habilitation, rehabilitation, and monitoring of hearing loss; hearing aids, cochlear implants, and hearing-assistive technology; hearing disorders; lifespan perspectives on auditory function; speech perception; and tinnitus.
AJA is continuously published, with articles added to the Newly Published section of the website as they complete production. The journal also publishes issues on a quarterly basis in March, June, September, and December, as well as special issues on an ad hoc basis at other times throughout the year.

Key Facts

Editor-in-Chief
Sumitrajit Dhar, PhD
Northwestern University

Impact Factor
1.125 (2015)
1.344 (5-year)

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AJSLP publishes peer-reviewed research and other scholarly articles on all aspects of clinical practice in speech-language pathology. The journal is an international outlet for clinical research pertaining to screening, detection, diagnosis, management, and outcomes of communication and swallowing disorders across the lifespan as well as the etiologies and characteristics of these disorders. Because of its clinical orientation, the journal disseminates research findings applicable to diverse aspects of clinical practice in speech-language pathology. AJSLP seeks to advance evidence-based practice by disseminating the results of new studies as well as providing a forum for critical reviews and meta-analyses of previously published work.
The broad field of speech-language pathology, including aphasia; apraxia of speech and childhood apraxia of speech; aural rehabilitation; augmentative and alternative communication; cognitive impairment; craniofacial disorders; dysarthria; fluency disorders; language disorders in children; speech sound disorders; swallowing, dysphagia, and feeding disorders; and voice disorders.
AJSLP is continuously published, with articles added to the Newly Published section of the website as they complete production. The journal also publishes issues on a quarterly basis in February, May, August, and November, as well as special issues on an ad hoc basis at other times throughout the year.

Key Facts

Editor-in-Chief
Krista Wilkinson, PhD
Pennsylvania State University

Impact Factor
1.413 (2015)
2.194 (5-year)

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JSLHR publishes peer-reviewed research and other scholarly articles on the normal and disordered processes in speech, language, hearing, and related areas such as cognition, oral-motor function, and swallowing. The journal is an international outlet for both basic research on communication processes and clinical research pertaining to screening, diagnosis, and management of communication disorders as well as the etiologies and characteristics of these disorders. JSLHR seeks to advance evidence-based practice by disseminating the results of new studies as well as providing a forum for critical reviews and meta-analyses of previously published work.
The broad field of communication sciences and disorders, including speech production and perception; anatomy and physiology of speech and voice; genetics, biomechanics, and other basic sciences pertaining to human communication; mastication and swallowing; speech disorders; voice disorders; development of speech, language, or hearing in children; normal language processes; language disorders; disorders of hearing and balance; psychoacoustics; and anatomy and physiology of hearing.
JSLHR is continuously published, with articles added to the Newly Published section of the website as they complete production. The journal also publishes 12 monthly issues per year, as well as special issues on an ad hoc basis at other times throughout the year.

Key Facts

Editors-in-Chief
Julie Liss, PhD
Arizona State University

Sean Redmond, PhD
University of Utah

Frederick Gallun, PhD
VA Portland Healthcare System

Impact Factor
1.526 (2015)
1.883 (5-year)

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LSHSS publishes peer-reviewed research and other scholarly articles pertaining to the practice of audiology and speech-language pathology in the schools, focusing on children and adolescents. The journal is an international outlet for clinical research and is designed to promote development and analysis of approaches concerning the delivery of services to the school-aged population. LSHSS seeks to advance evidence-based practice by disseminating the results of new studies as well as providing a forum for critical reviews and meta-analyses of previously published work.
The broad field of audiology and speech-language pathology as practiced in schools, including aural rehabilitation; augmentative and alternative communication; childhood apraxia of speech; classroom acoustics; cognitive impairment; craniofacial disorders; fluency disorders; hearing-assistive technology; language disorders; literacy disorders including reading, writing, and spelling; motor speech disorders; speech sound disorders; swallowing, dysphagia, and feeding disorders; voice disorders.
LSHSS is continuously published, with articles added to the Newly Published section of the website as they complete production. The journal also publishes issues on a quarterly basis in January, April, July, and October, as well as special issues on an ad hoc basis at other times throughout the year.

Key Facts

Editor-in-Chief
Shelley Gray, PhD
Arizona State University

Impact Factor
1.345 (2015)
1.806 (5-year)

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Manuscript Types

The ASHA journals publish a wide variety of article types. Each journal welcomes submissions of the following types, unless otherwise noted below.

Research Articles are detailed studies reporting important new research results. Such articles must provide a compelling rationale for the experimental question, employ methods that are appropriate for answering that question, include sufficient detail about those methods to allow for replication, present meaningful data, analyze those data appropriately, and interpret them meaningfully.
Research articles include an abstract, introduction, methods and results sections, discussion, and relevant citations. The length of these submissions is typically a maximum of 40 manuscript pages, inclusive of citations, tables, and figures. However, this is a guideline only and not a strict requirement. Supplemental materials fall outside of any length guidelines.
Research Notes are brief articles presenting pilot, preliminary, and/or exploratory findings or a new method for the collection or analysis of data. The scientific findings should be explained and documented concisely. Research notes are a convenient venue for reporting findings that are suggestive but not compelling, technological devices or applications, follow-up data not adequate to support a research article, or any study that can be accurately described in few words.
These articles should include a short abstract and introductory paragraph and may be written as continuous text in order to keep them as succinct as possible. These are typically limited to 20 manuscript pages, including citations, tables, and figures, though this is a guideline rather than a strict requirement.
Review Articles give a comprehensive overview of an area of speech, language, or hearing sciences and/or disorders (i.e., systematic review or meta-analysis). Review Articless should be accessible to knowledgeable readers not expert in the subject area. They should be prepared with the same rigor as a research article reporting specific results.
The length of these submissions is typically a maximum of 40 manuscript pages, inclusive of citations, tables, and figures. However, this is a guideline only and not a strict requirement. Supplemental materials fall outside of any length guidelines.
Clinical Focus articles address topics that may be of primary clinical interest but may not have a traditional research format. Case studies, descriptions of clinical programs, and innovative clinical services and activities are among the possibilities. These types of articles can serve to inform the readership of the cutting edge of practice and to promote larger scale research programs.
Note: Submissions of this type are not applicable for JSLHR.
Tutorials are educational expositions covering recent literature on topics of interest to clinicians and other scholars.
The length of these submissions is typically a maximum of 40 manuscript pages, inclusive of citations, tables, and figures. However, this is a guideline only and not a strict requirement. Supplemental materials fall outside of any length guidelines.
Viewpoints are scholarly based opinion(s) on an issue of clinical relevance that currently may be neglected, controversial, or related to future legislation, or that could serve to update the readership on current thinking in an area.
At present, Viewpoint submissions are only available in AJSLP.
World Views are articles in which authors from different countries write about pertinent aspects of the profession of speech-language pathology or audiology in their country. This format can also include writings on issues of clinical interaction in the field by authors from related disciplines.
At present, World View submissions are only available in AJSLP.
Letters to the Editor provide a means to share opinions about material previously published in the journal or views on topics of current relevance. A letter relating to work published in the journal will ordinarily be referred to the author(s) of the original item for a response, which may be published along with the letter.
Letters are typically limited to 15 manuscript pages, including citations, tables, and figures.

Resources

Note: Prior to 2017, Supplements were published within issues. As the journals have grown in size, that practice has been ended.

Instead, the journals now publish Special Issues when a group of articles is likely to be 10 or more in size or if there is a range of topics in a particular subject needing to be addressed.

Consult our Guide to Special Issues and Forums for full details on these types of submissions



Advantages of Publishing in an ASHA Journal

As a professional society representing more than 191,500 members who are audiologists, speech-language pathologists and speech, language, and hearing scientists, ASHA is committed to the publication of research, and has been for more than 80 years.

Every member and affiliate of ASHA has full access to each of the four journals and their complete archives as a benefit of membership or affiliation. When you choose to publish in an ASHA journal, your research is, therefore, directly available to a very large readership. Moreover, that readership grows as ASHA grows. An article published in an ASHA journal 10 years ago, for example, is now available to roughly 70,000 more people than at the time of publication.

In today’s changing publishing landscape, citation rates are still obviously important, but of increasing importance is the extent to which your research receives attention. Attention is the first step on the path toward increasing citation, and the ASHA journals, in addition to being highly cited, are uniquely positioned to get your work noticed and used.